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Children of Color Being Sought After From All The Ivy League Schools

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What’s the one thing ALL children from minority families can say they’ve heard at least once? “You have to work twice as hard to earn half as much.”

We all know what that means. It’s all over the news how people of color are always blocked from access and opportunity to a real solid education or a chance to make a decent living. It’s no wonder this country is already in hell’s hand basket. But every once in a while there comes a story that makes us smile. In today’s case there are three.

Munira Khalif, a senior at Mounds Park Academy in St. Paul, Minnesota was accepted to all eight Ivy League schools. Also several other universities who are up there in reputation. The big name schools are Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Yale, Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania. Khalif was also accepted to Stanford, Georgetown and the University of Minnesota. Let’s hope she knows about Stanford offering free tuition to families who make under $125,000 a year.

Meanwhile in Utica, New York, Vietnamese immigrant Trinh Truong was accepted to all 13 schools she applied to — including 5 Ivy League schools.

Not to be forgotten, Harold Ekeh, 17, another New York state teen and immigrant was accepted to all eight Ivy League schools.

These kids and their parents had a goal and a plan then busted it out until they made it. That’s to be applauded. It definitely couldn’t have been easy. That’s what one has to do today. Set a goal, make a plan and then work until it gets done and gets you there. Too many liars out there telling you there’s an easy way to make it. That in itself is the worst lie anyone can ever believe. So congrats to these three and to all the others busting out those grades to get to the next level. You go and get your hustle on! We know you’re gonna make that paper right.

For more details on the two ladies: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/minnesota-teen-munira-khalif-accepted-all-eight-ivy-league-schools-n338661

For details on Harold and his choices: http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/harold-ekeh-17-long-island-gets-accepted-all-eight-ivy-n337506

Jay Z’s Playlist Ranked – How Would You Rank Them?

jayz

With 225 album tracks included in his catalog, Jay-Z officially has more songs than he has problems. Now that Jigga’s seemingly slowing down on full-time rap responsibilities, and has TOTALLY ABANDONED NEW YORK, Thrill List decided we’d send him off by analyzing and heartlessly ranking every single one.

Thrill list ranks them: http://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/new-york/jay-z-songs-ranked-nyc

How would you rank them?

Burlesque Brought Sexy Back – Brown Sugar Is Bubbling Over In Brooklyn

Mo Betta Burlesque

Essence Revealed knows how to captivate a crowd. And we all know she is just bubblin’ over with Brown Sugar- delicious! If you don’t get all you desire in your basket this Easter- Essence will surely satisfy that sweet tooth! Mo Betta Burlesque – MONDAY April 6! 10pm! No Cover. Mo’s Fort Greene!

Essence Revealed

Check out Essence on her website: http://www.theessencerevealed.com

Sexy is back and in a wonderful way, the way of Burlesque.

The Conversation Project – Will You Join In The Conversation?

The Conversation Project

In the hopes of starting a positive healing process, after the lost lives of young people for what appears to be no reason other than the color of their skin, we came together – to talk. OPENLY, HONESTLY, CANDIDLY. Not to point fingers, not to incite, but to try to delve into the rawness of the truth so as to simply begin to heal and begin to work together towards solutions and STEPS FORWARD instead of feeling sucked into the abyss that evil forces are trying to keep our country in.

THE CONVERSATION (PART ONE) What It Means To Be Black In America In This Century

ELDERS LEADING THE CONVERSATION: Kenneth L. Foote, Mark Anthony Neal, Dr. Christopher Emdin

SQUIRES JOINING IN: Elijah M. Brown, Tywan Anthony

Concept by Carmen M Colon and Kenneth L. Foote, Directed by: Paul Mondesire Videotaped by: DK Knighton

TOPIC ONE: Justice or Just Us

 


 
Send in your conversations and let’s keep talking to each other. Submit your videos to: MFIR.RADIO@GMAIL.COM

CATHAY WILLIAMS

 

Cathay Williams (September 1844 – 1892) was an American soldier. She is the first African-American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man, under the pseudonym William Cathay. 

Williams was born in Independence, Missouri to a free man of color and a woman in bondage, making her legal status also that of a slave. During her adolescence, Williams worked as a house servant on the Johnson plantation on the outskirts of Jefferson City, Missouri. In 1861 Union forces occupied Jefferson City in the early stages of the American Civil War. At that time, captured slaves were officially designated by the Union as “contraband,” and many were forced to serve in military support roles such as cooks, laundresses, or nurses. At age seventeen, Williams was impressed into serving the 8th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment, commanded by Colonel William Plummer Benton.

For the next few years, Williams travelled with the 8th Indiana, accompanying the soldiers on their marches through Arkansas, Louisiana, and Georgia. She was present at theBattle of Pea Ridge and the Red River Campaign. At one time she was transferred to Little Rock, where she would have seen uniformed African-American men serving as soldiers, which may have inspired her own interest in military service. Later, Williams was transferred to Washington, D.C., where she served with General Philip Sheridan‘s command. When the war ended, Williams was working at Jefferson Barracks.

Despite the prohibition against women serving in the military, Williams enlisted in the United States Regular Army on 15 November 1866 at St. Louis, Missouri for a three year engagement, passing herself off as a man. Only two others are known to have been privy to the deception, her cousin and a friend, both of whom were fellow soldiers in her regiment.

Shortly after her enlistment, Williams contracted smallpox, was hospitalized and rejoined her unit, which by then was posted in New Mexico. Possibly due to the effects of smallpox, the New Mexico heat, or the cumulative effects of years of marching, her body began to show signs of strain. She was frequently hospitalized. The post surgeon finally discovered she was a woman and informed the post commander. She was discharged from the Army by her commanding officer, Captain Charles E. Clarke on October 14, 1868.

In September 1891, a doctor employed by the Pension Bureau examined Williams. Despite the fact that she suffered from neuralgia and diabetes, had had all her toes amputated, and could only walk with a crutch, the doctor decided she did not qualify for disability payments. Her application was rejected.

The exact date of Williams’ death is unknown, but it is assumed she died shortly after being denied a pension, probably sometime in 1892. Her simple grave marker would have been made of wood and deteriorated long ago. Thus her final resting place is now unknown.

BLACK HISTORY ON THIS DAY OF THE 21TH

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Black History on this day the 13th of Feb

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1968: Black athletes make silent protest

1968: Black athletes make silent protest
Peter Norman, Tommie Smith and John Carlos

Two black American athletes have made history at the Mexico Olympics by staging a silent protest against racial discrimination.

Tommie Smith and John Carlos, gold and bronze medallists in the 200m, stood with their heads bowed and a black-gloved hand raised as the American National Anthem played during the victory ceremony.

The pair both wore black socks and no shoes and Smith wore a black scarf around his neck. They were demonstrating against continuing racial discrimination of black people in the United States.

As they left the podium at the end of the ceremony they were booed by many in the crowd.

‘Black America will understand’

At a press conference after the event Tommie Smith, who holds seven world records, said: “If I win I am an American, not a black American. But if I did something bad then they would say ‘a Negro’. We are black and we are proud of being black.

“Black America will understand what we did tonight.”

Smith said he had raised his right fist to represent black power in America, while Carlos raised his left fist to represent black unity. Together they formed an arch of unity and power.

He said the black scarf represented black pride and the black socks with no shoes stood for black poverty in racist America.

Within a couple of hours the actions of the two Americans were being condemned by the International Olympic Committee.

A spokesperson for the organisation said it was “a deliberate and violent breach of the fundamental principles of the Olympic spirit.”

It is widely expected the two will be expelled from the Olympic village and sent back to the US.

In September last year Tommie Smith, a student at San Jose State university in California, told reporters that black members of the American Olympic team were considering a total boycott of the 1968 games.

‘Dirty negro’

He said: “It is very discouraging to be in a team with white athletes. On the track you are Tommie Smith, the fastest man in the world, but once you are in the dressing rooms you are nothing more than a dirty Negro.”

The boycott had been the idea of professor of sociology at San Jose State university, and friend of Tommie Smith, Harry Edwards.

Professor Edwards set up the Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) and appealed to all black American athletes to boycott the games to demonstrate to the world that the civil rights movement in the US had not gone far enough.

He told black Americans they should refuse “to be utilised as ‘performing animals’ in the games.”

Although the boycott never materialised the OPHR gained much support from black athletes around the world.

 

 

 

In Context
That evening, the silver medallist in the 200m event, Peter Norman of Australia, who was white, wore an OPHR badge in support of Smith and Carlos’ protest.But two days later the two athletes were suspended from their national team, expelled from the Olympic village and sent home to America.

Many felt they had violated the Olympic spirit by drawing politics into the games.

On their return both men were welcomed as heroes by the African-American community but others regarded them as trouble-makers. Both received death threats.

Thirty years after their protest, the two men, who went on to become high school athletics coaches, were honoured for their part in furthering the civil rights movement in America.

BLACK HISTORY !!!!!!!

 

Black History Month brings to the forefront the inspiring stories of African-American icons—many of whom overcame great odds to leave their mark on the United States. In celebration of Black History Month, explore our Black History collection and learn more about the black individuals who have made extraordinary achievements in their fields, including inventors such as George Washington Carver, activists like Malcolm X and Rosa Parks, athletes such as Willie Mays and Michael Jordan, and entertainers like Bessie Smith and Oprah Winfrey. Their names, as well as their personal histories, have become synonymous with the rich legacy that is African-American culture.

 

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