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Beanie Sigel Calls Drake and Meek Mill’s Beef “Gay”

MFIR Radio Interview with Mula Migz

JEEZY and Community Development/The Promise Center to host the 1st Annual Family Turkey Giveaway

Yesterday, recording artist JEEZY partnered with the Central Georgia Partnership for Individual and Community Development/The Promise Center to host the 1st Annual Family Turkey Giveaway.

For over 10 years he has visited his hometown of Macon, GA to lead holiday philanthropic activities. Yesterday’s participants were treated to local performances as well as encouraging words from Jeezy. He gave away over 250 turkeys to needy families.

“I love Bibb county, it feels like a family reunion,” Jenkins said. “I have been doing this for twelve years now and I always want to give back to the community”

Jeezy was presented a key to Macon-Bibb and a proclamation from Macon-Bibb County Commissioner Virgil Watkins Jr. recognizing him for his longtime service to the community.

“Today is StreetDreamz day in Macon,” Watkins said. “We wanted to honor Jenkins for all he does for the community.”

Cops fix car of chokehold victim’s mom after ticket

Cops fix car of chokehold victim’s mom after ticket

The mother of police-chokehold victim Eric Garner was pulled over for a busted headlight on Staten Island last week and promptly got the borough’s top cop to send out NYPD officers to fix the minivan for her so she could get out of the ticket, sources told The Post.

Gwen Carr, 65, was furious when a cop pulled her over for the cracked light on her 2006 Kia Sedona on the night of Oct. 21, sources said.

Before the ticket-issuing officer could get back to his station house, Carr called borough commander Edward Delatorre to complain, the sources said.

Delatorre had given Carr his phone number in the days after her son’s death in case she needed to contact him directly, a law-enforcement source said.

To the shock of many officers, Delatorre phoned Capt. Alan Larson of the Staten Island Task Force — and the cop who pulled her over was chewed out because he hadn’t recognized her name, sources said.

Larson called a lieutenant in the task force and said, “Make this right, and go fix it,’’ a source said.

The lieutenant called a sergeant in the Emergency Service Unit and told him to fix the light, sources said.

“You’re kidding me, right?” the sergeant, Anthony Lisi, replied, according to a source.

“No, I’m not joking. I’m being ordered to do it. I need help,” the lieutenant replied, according to the source.

“I’ll give you the tools, but I’m not changing the light,’’ Lisi answered, according to sources.

THE MESSAGE THAT BRASS IS SENDING TO THE PUBLIC IS, “IF THEY GET A TICKET, DON’T PAY IT, JUST CALL AN NYPD BOSS AND THEY’LL FIX IT.”

 – PBA President Patrick Lynch

The lieutenant called back shortly after and said, “Forget it. We’re taking care of it,” according to sources.

That lieutenant and a sergeant then acted as Carr’s personal pit crew and went shopping for a head lamp at an auto-parts store, sources said.

The cops drove with the new light to Carr’s home, where they made the fix themselves.

They even gave her the papers needed to void her summons. The ticket, which carries a maximum fine of $150, can be voided if it is fixed within 24 hours.

“The cops were ordered to do this,” a police source confirmed. “They paid for it themselves. They did the work themselves and took care of the ticket.”

The NYPD declined to comment. Neither Delatorre nor Larson or Lisi could immediately be reached.

Ed Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, called the incident unfair ticket-fixing — noting it was particularly outrageous given that scores of cops have been tainted by the Bronx ticket-fixing scandal.

“It’s sad how hardworking police officers were arrested for a culture of ticket-fixing in the NYPD, and years later, high-ranking chiefs and captains continue the culture and have now opened the NYPD to the auto repair business,” he said.

Louis Turco, president of the Lieutenants Benevolent Association, said, “My lieutenant was following orders from a superior.’’

PBA President Patrick Lynch called for an investigation.

The message that brass is sending to the public is, “If they get a ticket, don’t pay it, just call an NYPD boss and they’ll fix it,” he said.

Garner died in July while being arrested for allegedly peddling cigarettes His family has filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the city for $75 million.

Former UPS Worker Steals Diamond Ring Worth $160K And Trades For A $20 Bag Of Weed

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you’ve heard of ‘America’s Dumbest Criminals’, but this guy’s stupidity alone should be illegal

No one knew the addiction to marijuana could be this serious, but maybe he just wanted to smoke that bad.

20 year old Walter Morrison was fired from his job at UPS then charged with felony theft after allegedly stealing a diamond ring worth over $160,000 from a UPS cargo plane. The Phoenix, Arizona man obviously didn’t know how much the ring he lifted at work was worth.

Morrison allegedly traded the pricey diamond for a dub sack of chronic. Yes, the soon-to-be felon traded a diamond that could’ve easily bought him a nice house and an expensive car and he gave that in exchange for $20 worth of marijuana.

Needless to say, the diamond ring was recovered and given to it’s rightful owner while Morrison awaits his arraignment in Phoenix’s Maricopa County Superior Court on Tuesday.

ELIZABETH “BESSIE” COLEMAN

Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926) was an American civil aviator. She was the first female pilot of African American descent and the first person of African-American descent to hold an international pilot license.

Coleman quickly realized that in order to make a living as a civilian aviator—the age of commercial flight was still a decade or more in the future—she would need to become a “barnstorming” stunt flier, and perform for paying audiences. But to succeed in this highly competitive arena, she would need advanced lessons and a more extensive repertoire. Returning to Chicago, Coleman could find no one willing to teach her, so in February 1922, she sailed again for Europe. She spent the next two months in France completing an advanced course in aviation, then left for the Netherlands to meet with Anthony Fokker, one of the world’s most distinguished aircraft designers. She also traveled to Germany, where she visited the FokkerCorporation and received additional training from one of the company’s chief pilots. She returned to the United States with the confidence and enthusiasm she needed to launch her career in exhibition flying.

“Queen Bess,” as she was known was a highly popular draw for the next five years. Invited to important events and often interviewed by newspapers, she was admired by both blacks and whites. She primarily flew Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny”biplanes and army surplus aircraft left over from the war. She made her first appearance in an American airshow on September 3, 1922, at an event honoring veterans of the all-black 369th Infantry Regiment of World War I. Held at Curtiss Field on Long Island near New York City and sponsored by her friend Abbott and the Chicago Defender newspaper, the show billed Coleman as “the world’s greatest woman flier” and featured aerial displays by eight other American ace pilots, and a jump by black parachutist Hubert Julian. Six weeks later she returned to Chicago to deliver a stunning demonstration of daredevil maneuvers—including figure eights, loops, and near-ground dips—to a large and enthusiastic crowd at the Checkerboard Airdrome (now Chicago Midway Airport).

But the thrill of stunt flying and the admiration of cheering crowds were only part of Coleman’s dream. Coleman never lost sight of her childhood vow to one day “amount to something.” As a professional aviator, Coleman would often be criticized by the press for her opportunistic nature and the flamboyant style she brought to her exhibition flying. However, she also quickly gained a reputation as a skilled and daring pilot who would stop at nothing to complete a difficult stunt. In Los Angeles, she broke a leg and three ribs when her plane stalled and crashed on February 22, 1923.

Through her media contacts, she was offered a role in a feature-length film titled Shadow and Sunshine, to be financed by the African American Seminole Film Producing Company. She gladly accepted, hoping the publicity would help to advance her career and provide her with some of the money she needed to establish her own flying school. But upon learning that the first scene in the movie required her to appear in tattered clothes, with a walking stick and a pack on her back, she refused to proceed. “Clearly … [Bessie’s] walking off the movie set was a statement of principle. Opportunist though she was about her career, she was never an opportunist about race. She had no intention of perpetuating the derogatory image most whites had of most blacks”, wrote Doris Rich.

Coleman would not live long enough to fulfill her dream of establishing a school for young black aviators, but her pioneering achievements served as an inspiration for a generation of African American men and women. “Because of Bessie Coleman,” wrote Lieutenant William J. Powell in Black Wings 1934, dedicated to Coleman, “we have overcome that which was worse than racial barriers. We have overcome the barriers within ourselves and dared to dream”.Powell served in a segregated unit during World War I, and tirelessly promoted the cause of black aviation through his book, his journals, and the Bessie Coleman Aero Club, which he founded in 1929.

HONORS

A public library in Chicago is named in Coleman’s honor, as is a road at O’Hare International Airport and at Frankfurt International Airport.

Bessie Coleman Boulevard in Waxahachie, Texas, (where she lived as a child) is named in her honor.

In 1995, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 32 cent stamp honoring Coleman.

A bronze plaque with Coleman’s likeness was installed on the front doors of Paxon School for Advanced Studies in 2012. The school is located on the site of the Jacksonville airfield where Coleman’s fatal flight took off.

 

Dr.Patrica E. Frankel

Dr. Patricia Bath, ophthalmologic surgeon, inventor, and activist for patients’ rights, was born in Harlem, New York in 1942, the daughter of Rupert Bath, an educated and well-traveled merchant seaman, and Gladys Bath, a homemaker and housecleaner. They were loving and supportive parents who encouraged their children to focus on education and believe in their dreams and ideas.

Thus Bath developed a love of books, travel and science. She excelled at school and began to show her aptitude in biology in high school where she became editor of the Charles Evans Hughes High School’s science paper and won numerous science awards. In fact, she was chosen in 1959 at the age of 16 to participate in a summer program offered by the National Science Foundation at Yeshiva University. She gained notoriety when, while working at Yeshiva, she derived a mathematical equation for predicting cancer cell growth. One of her mentors in the program, Dr. Robert O. Bernard, incorporated her findings into a paper he presented at an international conference held in Washington, D.C., in 1960.

Following this experience, Bath won a 1960 Merit Award fromMademoiselle magazine, completed high school in just two and a half years, and entered New York’s Hunter College to study chemistry and physics. She earned a B.A. from Hunter in 1964. From there Bath went to medical school at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Bath finished her M.D. in 1968 and returned to New York as an intern at Harlem Hospital, followed by a fellowship in ophthalmology at Columbia University from 1969-70. During this time Bath began to notice differences among the patient population in hospitals she had worked in.

At Harlem Hospital, where there were many African American patients, nearly half were blind or visually impaired. But at Columbia Eye Clinic, the blindness rate was markedly lower. She conducted a study documenting her observation that blindness among blacks was nearly double the rate of blindness among whites. She concluded that this was largely due to many African Americans’ lack of access to ophthalmic care. With this finding Bath established a new discipline known as Community Ophthalmology, now studied and practiced worldwide. She also helped bring eye surgery services to Harlem Hospital’s Eye Clinic, which has since helped to treat and cure thousands of patients.

From this point on, Bath’s list of firsts continued to grow. She became the first African American resident at New York University where she finished her medical training in 1973. Meanwhile she also married and had a child, while completing a fellowship in 1974 in corneal and keratoporosthesis surgery.

Kendrick Lamar responds to Grammys Snub

Kendrick Lamar responds to Grammys snubKendrick Lamar was nominated for seven awards at this year’s Grammy Awards and somehow walked away with none.

Yet the “good kid, m.A.A.d. city” rapper is taking the snub in stride – even though one of his peers, Macklemore, had a harder time doing so.

Macklemore, along with his collaborator, Ryan Lewis, faced off against Lamar for the major rap awards and the best new artist honor. By the end of the ceremony, Macklemore had taken them all, including the best rap album title. That Grammy win in and of itself sparked a heated debate, with several – including Macklemore himself – saying Lamar had been robbed of a prize that was rightly his.

But in Lamar’s eyes, Macklemore deserved the award just as much.

“It’s well-deserved,” he told XXL magazine. “He did what he did, man, he went out there and hustled and grinded. Everything happens for a reason; the universe comes back around, that’s how it go.”

At least Lamar was a clear winner when it came to the performances at the Grammy Awards – his set with Imagine Dragons, a mashup of “Radioactive” and “m.A.A.d. City,” is thought to be one of the best of the night

TRINIDAD JAMES ARRESTED FOR WEED

0210-nicholas-williams-trinidad-jamesTrinidad James may have looked baked out of his mind in the mug shot after his arrest last week … but pics don’t convict …so James is walking…
James was busted Friday for possession of marijuana after lighting up in his Mississippi Holiday Inn hotel room — but after further investigation,  cops have backed off the case.

We asked repeatedly why they won’t even present the case to prosecutors … but we got nothin’.

On second look … we take back what we said earlier … that pics don’t convict.

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